Isolation of maltol glucoside from the floral nectar of New Zealand Mānuka

Isolation of maltol glucoside from the floral nectar of New Zealand Mānuka

New Zealand mānuka honey is derived from the floral nectar of themānuka tree (Leptospermum scoparium J.R. Forst. & G. Forst., Myrtaceae). Dihydroxyacetone (DHA), which is found in the nectar, converts to methylglyoxal in the maturing honey (Adams, Manley- Harris, & Molan, 2009). The presence of methylglyoxal imparts non-peroxide antibacterial activity to the honey, as a result of which it is highly priced on the international market; however, there are acknowledged problems with guaranteeing the monoflorality of the honey.

These problems arise in part from the need to distinguish the pollens of mānuka and kānuka (Kunzea ericoides), as they are often found growing in the same environment, and the flowering seasons may overlap to some extent. The possibility of misrepresentation of mānuka honey has promulgated the development of guidelines about the labelling of mānuka honey originating from New Zealand, but these are necessarily constrained by the limitations outlined above.

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